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TRN-10.09 - Bicycle Rack Permit

BICYCLE RACK PERMIT
Administrative Rule Adopted by Bureau of Transportation Engineering & Development Pursuant to Rule-Making Authority
ARB-TRN-10.09

 
I. Definition
 
The City of Portland Office of Transportation issues permits for bicycle racks within the public right-of-way. Permits may be obtained for bicycle racks that are standard design as well as approved original designed art racks on sidewalks that meet City of Portland sidewalk requirements. Please see bicycle racks: www.portlandtransportation.org.
 

 
II. Administrative Rule
 
All public sidewalks must have a minimum clear passage for pedestrians. A five (5) foot unobstructed sidewalk is required on all city streets and six (6) feet is required on arterial, commercial, or Central Business District streets. See diagram below for minimum required area. The rack should be aligned with existing street furniture, tree wells, etc., so as not to block the clear path of pedestrian traffic or the doors of vehicles parked at the curb. The entire required area must be located within the furnishing zone as defined by the Portland Pedestrian Design Guidelines page A-12. The minimum sidewalk corridor for placement of a bike rack is ten (10) feet. If the above requirements cannot be provided the City Engineer may reduce the required area if the following is met: 1) the rack is no closer than two (2) feet from the curb and 2) the rack is no closer than one (1) foot six (6) inches from the through pedestrian zone. Exemptions to the required area will be reviewed on a case by case basis.
 
Minimum required area:
Standard Bike Racks
The standard bike rack permit issued by the City of Portland is for hitching post racks (see City Standard Specification Plan #3-52). Specifications for a hitching post bike rack may be obtained by contacting Street Systems Management at 503.8237002. Other types of racks may also be permitted upon City of Portland approval and agreement of ownership and maintenance.
Application includes:
    1. A site plan showing a north arrow, street names, sidewalk configuration and dimensions, pertinent street furniture and features, on-street parking adjacent to the proposed rack, an exact location of the proposed rack, orientation on site and rack type.
    2. Name and address of the business or organization requesting the rack.
    3. Contact name and phone number.
Bicycle Art Racks
Art racks are non-standard bicycle racks that are owned and maintained by the permittee. Applications for Bicycle Art Racks may be obtained by calling Transportation Options at 503.823.5185. A fee will be charged for the revocable permit.
 
Bicycle Art Rack Permit Requirements
This is intended to cover standards, requirements and suggestions on designing and installing short-term bicycle parking in the right-of-way for non-standard bicycle racks. There are additional parking code requirements for required bicycle parking. See Title 33.266.200 to 220 for complete bike parking code requirements, or the Bicycle Parking Facilities Guidelines brochure available through the Office of Transportation.
 
These guidelines are intended to clarify and not replace existing parking code, requirements, or other standards. The City of Portland Office of Transportation will use its professional expertise, experience, and specific code and other requirements to issue a revocable permit for installation of a non-standard rack in the public right-of-way.
 
Bicycle Rack Goals
 
PDOT recognizes that the installation of bicycle parking racks, especially racks of innovative and aesthetic designs by property owners improves Portland’s transportation infrastructure and enhances Portland’s image as a livable innovative city. In particular, the installation of bicycle racks on city streets furthers these goals:
  • To provide needed parking for the increasing number of people who choose bicycling as a transportation option
  • To enhance Portland’s image as a people- and bicycle-friendly city; a community that regards bicycles as a permanent and important part of the city’s transportation infrastructure
  • To encourage more people to choose cycling as a transportation option
  • To create a new symbol for our city’s livability that will gain positive attention locally, regionally and nationally.
Bicycle Racks must be designed and installed so that:
  • A bicycle frame and front wheel may be conveniently and securely locked to the bicycle rack using a standard U-shaped shackle lock;
  • A bicycle will be reasonably safeguarded from damage;
  • Each bicycle parking space is easily accessible without moving another bicycle for access and maneuvering;
  • Each bicycle rack is securely anchored;
  • It meets all requirements set forth within Administrative Rules for Standard Bicycle Rack Permits and Encroachments .
Safety
  • All bicycle rack designs must adhere to all Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards for protrusions in the right-of-way including the ability to detect the rack with a white cane. To be detected by a white cane the protruding or leading edge of the rack shall be 27" or less above the sidewalk surface. Between 27" and 80" above the sidewalk surface, protruding or leading edges may overhang a maximum of 12".
  • The top of the bicycle rack design must be a minimum of 36" tall. Except for the bicycle rack supporting brackets, the shortest section of the bicycle rack must be a minimum of 27" tall - enough to be perceived by pedestrians and avoid tripping hazards.
  • The space between rack features must be larger than 9" and smaller than 3.5" to avoid children trapping their heads.
  • The design must not include sharp edges.
Space
All Racks
    • The bicycle rack footprint must fit entirely in the furnishing zone as defined by the Portland Pedestrian Design Guidelines page A-12.
    • Ten feet is the minimum sidewalk width for siting bicycle racks.
    • There shall be a minimum of 5' on the sidewalk behind or on the side of the parked bicycle to safely maneuver in and out of the rack without moving another bicycle.
    • Bicycle racks shall not be located in residential areas with densities at R 2.5 or less.
    • The rack should have a minimum of 2' clearance in length parallel to the curb on either side of the bicycle rack footprint.
    • The rack shall be a maximum of 6' in length parallel to the curb and have adequate clearance available for pedestrian access.
    • Bicycle racks can not be installed adjacent to disabled parking zones.
    • Other locations not meeting these guidelines may be permitted upon City of Portland approval.
Two Dimensional Racks Installed Parallel to the Curb with Bicycles Parked Parallel to the Curb
    • The bicycle rack footprint shall be a minimum of 2' on either side of the rack plus the length of the rack by 4' wide.
    • There shall be a minimum of 6" between the face of the curb and the bicycle rack footprint. One foot is preferred when on-street parking is adjacent to the curb.
Two and Three Dimensional Racks with Bicycles Parked Perpendicular to the Curb with Bicycle Parking Accessed from Only One Side of the Rack
    • The bicycle rack footprint shall be a minimum of 2' on either side of the rack plus the length of the rack by a minimum of 7’ plus the width of the rack. To determine the number of bicycles a rack can accommodate, each bicycle requires a minimum of 2' width between bicycles to park.
      • There shall be a minimum of 1' between the face of the curb and the bicycle rack footprint. For higher volume or higher speed traffic streets, the Office of Transportation may require additional space between the bicycle rack footprint and face of the curb.
Two and Three Dimensional Racks with Bicycle Parking Accessed on Two Sides of the Bicycle Rack
    • The bicycle rack footprint shall be a minimum of 2' on either side of the rack plus the length of the rack by 9' plus the width of the rack. To determine the number of bicycles a rack can accommodate each bicycle requires a minimum of 17" width to park.
    • There shall be a minimum of 1' between the face of the curb and the bicycle rack footprint. For higher volume or higher speed traffic streets, the Office of Transportation may require additional space between the bicycle rack footprint and face of the curb.
 
Possible Rack Materials Include:
  • The design should be fabricated of Schedule 40 pipe with maximum 3" outside diameter, minimum 11-gauge tube, and/or metal plating with a minimum ¼" thickness.
  • Any square or round solid stock should be minimum dimension of 3/8" cold rolled or ½" hot rolled.
  • The plates should have minimum of 1/8" interior radius and ¼" exterior radius.
  • The rack should be sandblast finished before final coating with a minimum 3-5 mils thick powdercoating or a hot-dip galvanized finish.
  • Other material may be approved by the City of Portland.
Rack Installation May Include:
 
Base Plate Installation
    • The base plates should be a minimum of 3/8" thick.
    • Bolts should be vandal-resistant.
In-Ground Installation
    • For in-ground mounting, the rack must extend at least 8" below the concrete surface. A minimum 3"-long crossbar should be welded to the pipe to secure mounting.

      *Alternative installations may be approved by the City of Portland.
Liability and Maintenance
  • The property owner or permittee will own and is responsible for any and all liability and maintenance associated with the bicycle rack.
Revocable Permit
  • The City Engineer grants a revocable permit to install a bicycle rack in the right-of-way. This permit is revocable and establishes maintenance and liability to the adjacent property owner or permittee with liability insurance on file with Portland’s Office of Transportation. The City Engineer may revoke the permit at any time in the event the public's need requires it, or the permittee fails to comply with the conditions of the permit. There is a permit and recording fee for revocable permits (see current SSM fee schedule).
Sidewalk Conditions
  • To obtain a permit to install a bicycle rack, PDOT Street Systems will inspect the right-of-way adjacent to the property to be sure it is up to City Standards. If it is not up to City Standards, the property owner will be responsible for bring it up to City Standards.
Definitions
  • Bicycle Rack Footprint - the space necessary to accommodate a bicycle rack with the recommended maximum bicycles parked to the rack. This does not include the necessary clearances for siting a bicycle rack in the right-of-way.
  • Furnishings Zone - a linear portion of the Sidewalk Corridor, adjacent to the curb that contains elements such as street trees, signal poles, street lights, bicycle racks or other street furniture. This area does not include the width of the Curb Zone that can be as wide as 6".
  • Pedestrian District - district characterized by dense mixed-use development with a concentration of pedestrian-generating activities.
  • Two Dimensional Racks - bicycle racks that are no wider than 4".
  • Three Dimensional Racks - bicycle racks that are wider than 4".
  • Through Pedestrian Zone - a linear portion of the Sidewalk Corridor which contains no obstructions, openings, or other impediments that would prevent or discourage movement by pedestrians.
  • Right-of-Way - an easement held by the City over land owned by the adjacent property owners that allows the City to exercise control over the surface and above and below the ground of the right-of-way. Property owners are typically responsible for the construction of transportation improvements adjacent to their property. The City maintains the street, if it meets City standards, while the property owner is responsible for maintaining the sidewalk.
  • Urban Renewal Areas - Urban renewal is a program authorized by State of Oregon laws adopted in 1957 and 1961. Its purpose is to help communities improve and redevelop areas which are deteriorated, unsafe, have a lack of infrastructure such as streets, utilities, and sidewalks, and have extensive vacant and under-utilized property. In addition to being unsightly and unsafe, these areas often impose a burden on city services and can be costly to city taxpayers.
  • Walkway - a pedestrian facility, whether in the public right-of-way or on private property, which is provided for the benefit and use of the public.

 
III. Reference
 
City Code Title17, Chapter 17.28
Pursuant to Rulemaking Authority under Chapter 3.12

 
HISTORY
 
Filed for inclusion in PPD February 26, 2004.