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ENN-6.01 - Energy Policy

ENERGY POLICY
Non-binding City Policy
NCP-ENN-6.01
PURPOSE
 
The Council finds:
 
1. On August 15, 1979, the City Council adopted Ordinance No. 148251 creating an Energy Policy for the City of Portland.
 
2. On January 13, 1988, the Energy Commission determined that a new energy policy was needed due to significant changes in local, economic, environmental and energy issues.
 
3. Five task forces developed background technology reports that formed the basis for the first draft of the new energy policy.
 
4. Subsequent drafts of the energy policy were shaped by a technical review committee representing City bureaus such as Planning, Transportation, Environmental Services, Buildings, and General Services, and intergovernmental agencies including TRI-MET, Metropolitan Service District, Northwest Power Planning Council, and Bonneville Power Administration.
 
5. A draft energy policy was released for public review on January 3, 1990.  More than 1,200 copies were delivered to interested groups and individuals.
 
6. A public hearing on the draft energy policy was held with the Energy Commission on February 14, 1990.  On February 28, 1990, the Energy Commission amended the draft energy policy and approved it for review by the Planning Commission.
 
7. The City faces many issues that affect the health, safety, welfare and sustainability of the community and its residents and businesses.  Energy use and supply affect many of these issues and are closely linked to housing, commercial and industrial development, transportation, air and water quality, and waste management in the following ways.
a. More than $600 million is spent annually on energy in the City.  Most of that money leaves the City to purchase natural gas, oil products, coal, and electricity or goes to non-local investors.  Energy efficiency reduces the amount of money spent on energy and frees up funds for other goods and services, many of which are local.
 
b. Thirty-six percent of the energy expenditure is used for transportation; 28 percent for commerce and government; 22 percent for residences; and 14 percent for industry.
 
c. About 45 percent of total energy expenditures is for electricity;  36 percent for gasoline and diesel; 12 percent for natural gas; 6 percent for diesel for boilers and other fuel oils; and 1 percent for propane and other fuels;
 
d. More than 25,000 low-income households still need their homes weatherized and 40,000 multi-family rental units still need energy saving weatherization measures.
 
e. According to the Oregon Department of Energy, only twelve percent of single-family housing in the State is fully weatherized.  While numbers may be slightly higher for Portland, this indicates a tremendous potential for further energy and cost savings.
 
f. Most Portland commercial buildings are not as efficient as the current commercial building energy code.  Combined commercial/industrial sector annual energy expenditures are about $250 million, not including transportation costs.  Substantial energy savings can be made at low cost by investing in energy efficient measures.  Efforts to help Portland businesses reduce energy use would result in money available for capital, expansion, and other uses.  Furthermore, the business of energy efficiency results in increased business and employment opportunities.
 
g.  Gasoline and diesel account for nearly all of the transportation energy used in the City.  Mass transit uses only about two percent of this petroleum energy.  Increases in Federal mileage standards for new cars are the most effective short term way to reduce transportation energy use in the City.  Mass transit and compact urban growth are long term measures to reduce energy use.
 
h.  The City is dependent on foreign petroleum supplies for transportation, heat, and some industrial processes.  Reductions in oil use through improved energy efficiency and substitution can reduce the City's vulnerability to oil shortages and rapid price escalations.
8. The Northwest region no longer has an electricity surplus.  New supplies will be needed soon.  Energy efficiency has been identified by the Bonneville Power Administration, local utilities, and others as a significant resource for meeting future electricity needs.  Energy efficiency programs operated or facilitated by the City are essential to meeting regional electricity needs.
 
9.  The City can help solve regional and global environmental and natural resource problems, such as air pollution, ozone depletion, and global warming through local energy policies and programs.  Ozone depletion and global warming could cause disruption to the health and welfare of the community.  The City has already enacted policies to reduce the use of foam products made with chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that contribute to ozone depletion.
 
10.  The City can increase energy efficiency and help to develop sustainable energy resources in the following ways:
a.  The City can be a model energy consumer in its buildings, facilities and fleets.
 
b.  The City can provide and promote energy efficient infrastructure for water and wastewater treatment and delivery, transportation, and electricity and other energy supplies.
 
c.  The City can regulate and plan for energy use through the amendment and periodic review of the City's comprehensive plan and implementing land use regulations and policies.
 
d.  The City can enforce the energy standards of the building code.
 
e.  The City can be an energy efficiency service provider.
 
f.  The City can be an information provider, facilitator and educator for local residents and businesses.
 
g.  The City can promote and develop sustainable energy resources.
 
h.  The City can advocate the development and implementation of energy policies and programs by utilities and other local state and Federal governments.
11.  The planning process meets State Planning Goal 1, Citizen Involvement, through notification and involvement of neighborhood and business associations, and other interested groups, organizations, and parties throughout the two-year policy revision.  The Energy Office held workshops and informational meetings and accepted comments, the Energy Commission, Planning Commission, and City Council held public hearings and accepted testimony on the energy policy draft revisions.
 
12.  State Planning Goal 2, Land Use Planning, is met because the energy policy is based on factual information about energy use and supply affecting Portland and the state.  Opportunity has been provided for review and comment by citizens and affected governmental units during the preparation, review and revision of the energy policy, with ongoing coordination between Portland and other governmental units.
 
13.  State Goal 3, Agricultural Lands and State Goal 4, Forest Lands, are met because the energy policy promotes compact urban growth, thereby allowing for the continuation of existing agricultural and forest management operations.
 
14.  State Goal 5, Open Spaces and Historic Areas and Natural Resources is met because the energy policy supports sustainable energy resources, especially renewable resources which do not have adverse environmental, energy, social and economic consequences, and usage both protects and conserves natural resources.
 
15.  State Goal 6, Air, Water and Land Resource Quality, is met through promoting energy saving activities of waste reduction and recycling, supporting environmentally acceptable, sustainable energy sources, providing financial incentives for transportation options to reduce air pollution, and promoting tree planting to improve air quality.
 
16.  State Goal 9, Economic Development, is met because the energy policy encourages energy efficiency in existing commercial and industrial facilities and institutions, thereby contributing to cost savings and the viable economic base and livability of Portland.
 
17.  State Goal 10, Housing, is met because energy efficiency is encouraged in both new and existing residences in a cost effective manner which will help provide the housing needs of the citizens of the state.
 
18.  State Goal 11, Public Facilities and Services are met because the energy policy calls for updating basic data on the sources, uses and costs for municipal facilities within the City, and set up a system to track use and costs for major City facilities.
 
19.  State Goal 12, Transportation, is met because the energy policy provides opportunities for non-auto transportation including alternative vehicles, buses, light-rail, bikeways and walkways.
 
20. State Goal 13, Energy Conservation, is met because the policy promotes increased energy efficiency and will help to develop sustainable energy resources in many ways.
 
21.  State Goal 14, Urbanization, is met because the policy encourages energy efficiency in land use regulations for commercial, industrial, and residential uses as well as promoting energy efficient transportation modes and compact urban growth.
 
22.  State Goals 7, Areas Subject to Natural Disasters and Hazards, 8, Recreational Needs, 15, Willamette River Greenway, 16, Estuarine Resources, 17, Coastal Shoreland, and 18, Beaches and Dunes do not apply.
 
23.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 1, Metropolitan Coordination and Policy 1.4, Intergovernmental Coordination, are met because the energy policy has been coordinated with state and federal agencies, including the Oregon Department of Energy and Public Utility Commission, Federal BPA and DOE, the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Metropolitan Service District, and numerous local government agencies.
 
24.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 2, Urban Development, and Policies 2.10, Downtown Portland, 2.11 Commercial Centers, 2.12, Transit Corridors, 2.15, Living Closer to Work, 2.17, Transit Stations and 2.20, Mixed Use, are met because the energy policy promotes energy efficiency through land use regulations and alternative transportation modes.
 
25.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 3, Neighborhoods, is met because the energy policy promotes energy efficiency in existing residential buildings which preserves and stabilizes neighborhoods, as well as efforts at recycling and tree planting to preserve the City's residential quality and economic vitality.
 
26.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 4, Housing, is met because the energy policy helps to support a diversity in the type density and location of housing by providing for energy efficiency in existing and new residential units, promoting common wall construction in single and multi family units, and locating housing near employment centers.
 
27.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 5, Economic Development, and Policies 5.1, Business Retention and Recruitment, 5.2, Economic Environment, and 5.12, Environment, Energy and Transportation, are met because the energy policy will provide assistance to Portland businesses to access existing utility, State and Federal financial and technical assistance, and encourages recycling and other cost effective energy efficient programs.
 
28.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 6, Transportation, is met because the energy policy provides opportunities for non-auto transportation, including alternative vehicles, buses, light rail, bikeways and walkways, and encourages land uses which promote energy efficient transportation systems.
 
29.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 7, Energy, is being amended by the revised energy policy reflecting a new sustainable energy future that balances energy needs with a strong economy and livable environment.
 
30.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 8, Environment, and Policies 8.1. Interagency Cooperation - Air Quality and 8.4, Ride Sharing and 8.14, Natural Resources, are met because the energy policy supports environmentally acceptable, sustainable energy sources, especially renewable resources such as solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass (wood, farm and municipal waste), cogeneration, and district heating and cooling, and promotes financial incentives for transportation options that reduce greenhouse gases and improve air quality.
 
31.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 9, Citizen Involvement and Policies 9.1, Citizen Involvement Coordination and 9.3, Comprehensive Plan Amendment, are met through notification and involvement of neighborhood and business associations, and other interested groups, organizations, and parties throughout the two-year policy revision.  The Energy Office held workshops and informational meetings and accepted comments, the Energy Commission, Planning Commission and City Council held public hearings and accepted testimony on the energy policy draft revisions.
 
32.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 10, Plan Review and Administration, and Policy 10.1, Major Plan Review, are met because the energy Goal will promote a sustainable energy future by increasing energy efficiency in all sectors of the City by ten percent by the year 2000 in a manner complying with State Land Use Goals, particularly Goal 13, Energy Conservation.
 
33.  City Comprehensive Plan Goal 11 A-H Public Facilities, are met because the energy policy calls for updating basic data on the sources, uses and costs of energy within the City, and review major city policies and programs in the early stages of development to encourage energy efficiency.
 
34.  Other City Comprehensive Plan Policies and Objectives do not apply.
 
35.  The Energy Commission held a public hearing on February 14, 1990.  Based on testimony received, the Energy Commission voted to recommend the amendments be adopted.
 
36.  The Planning Commission held a public hearing on March 13, 1990 and briefings at their public meetings on October 11, 1988 and March 27, 1990 on the proposed energy policy revisions.  Based on testimony received, the Planning Commission voted to recommend the amendments be adopted.
 
37.  The amendments were submitted to the Department of Land Conservation and Development for review required by Oregon Administrative Rule 660-18.  No objections have been received.
 
38.  It is in the public interest that these amendments be adopted to better comply with Statewide Planning Goals, implement the Portland Comprehensive Plan, and promote a sustainable energy future for the City.

POLICY
 
NOW THEREFORE, the Council directs:
 
a.  The Energy Goal of the City is to:
Promote a sustainable energy future by increasing energy efficiency in all sectors of the City by ten percent by the year 2000.
 
In order to accomplish this goal, the following nine policies and related objectives are adopted as the Energy Policy of the City of Portland.
b.  Policy #1 shall be:  The Role of the City
 
The City Energy Office shall take a lead role in developing new energy-saving programs and assist other City bureaus with energy programs and policies. The Energy Office in coordination with the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs will seek funding from City, State, Federal, and regional agencies, utilities, and others to implement, monitor, and evaluate programs.
 
Other City bureaus also shall develop policies and programs that affect energy use. Many of the programs will be developed with assistance from the Energy Office and then integrated into the budgets and work plans of the appropriate City bureaus. The City will consider public and private benefits and costs in the development of programs.
 
The City Energy Commission shall be an advocate for energy efficiency and advise the City Council on energy policies and programs.
 
Objectives
 
Two-Year Action Plan
 
1. Compile and update basic data on the sources, uses and costs of energy within the City and related air quality, solid waste, and environmental data.
 
2. Review major City policies and programs in the early stages of development to encourage energy efficiency.
 
3. Work with neighborhoods to include energy policies as a part of revitalization efforts, in neighborhood plans, and in the Neighborhood Needs process.
 
4. Compile information on new energy technologies, policies, and programs that may prove helpful to Portland's economy and environment.
 
5. Participate in the utilities' least-cost planning processes. Advocate the role of cities in the development and delivery of conservation and renewable resources.
 
6. Implement local programs that reduce the level of greenhouse gases to help meet the State's goal of a 20 percent reduction in emissions by 2005.
 
7. Support Public Utility Commission regulatory changes to encourage more utility investments in energy efficiency.
 
8. Support stricter Federal energy efficiency appliance standards.
 
9. Review and update Energy Policy Two-Year Action Plan every two years.
 
10. Actively solicit funding for energy efficiency projects to leverage city dollars and efforts.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
11. Evaluate and update the Energy Policy every five years.
 
12. Support efforts to develop a Northwest energy research institute to provide technical and policy research for the substantial energy industry located in Portland.
 
13. Develop and promote energy education materials for the general public, elementary and secondary schools, and libraries.
 
14. Investigate opportunities for supporting energy programs through utility franchise agreements.
 
c.  Policy #2 shall be:  Energy Efficiency in City-Owned Facilities
 
The City shall promote cost-effective energy savings (simple paybacks of ten years or less) in municipally-owned buildings and facilities and take advantage of utility, State, and Federal technical and financial assistance programs.
 
Objectives
 
Two-Year Action Plan
 
1. Determine total energy use and costs for municipal facilities and set up a system to track use and costs for major City facilities.
 
2. Identify energy-saving measures including opportunities for the use of renewable resources in City government buildings and facilities and seek funding for improvements. Use the Oregon Office of Energy (OOE) Small-Scale Energy Loan Program, as appropriate.
 
3. Develop an energy-saving incentive program to encourage efficiency in City government by returning a portion of the money saved to the participating bureaus and for other energy projects.
 
4. Establish a set-aside fund for financing energy efficiency projects in City government buildings and facilities. Target the fund to 6/100ths of one percent of the City's General Fund.
 
5. Provide energy education materials to City employees to encourage energy efficiency at work and home.
 
6. Promote the use and design of energy efficient street lighting systems, and continue to convert street lights to be more energy efficient.
 
7. Promote the use of life-cycle costing in purchasing decisions made by the City.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
8. Increase municipal energy efficiency by ten percent by the year 2000 by reducing total energy use in City-owned buildings, facilities, and fleet.
 
9. Promote a reduction in artificial lighting and the increased use of daylighting in all new construction or major remodeling of City buildings and facilities.
 
10. Investigate the budget process for increasing the priority of capital improvements that reduce energy operating costs.
 
11. Where practicable, exceed the energy efficiency standards of the Oregon building code for new municipal buildings, facilities and major improvements. Cost-effective energy efficiency measures shall be taken, such as energy efficient lighting, high-efficiency motors and appliances, district heating and cooling systems, and the use of renewable resources.
 
d.  Policy #3 shall be:  Energy Efficiency in Residential Buildings
 
The City shall encourage energy efficiency in existing residences, focusing on the most energy-wasteful units, by helping to develop and promote public/private partnerships, utility, local, State, and Federal programs. The City also shall promote energy efficient new housing by enforcing the energy saving standards in the State building code.
 
Objectives
 
Two Year Action Plan
 
1. Facilitate the weatherization of 8,000 low-income, multi-family units through the City's Multi-Family Weatherization Program by 1992.
 
2. Expand the Multi-Family Weatherization Program to include single-family rental homes, when funding is available.
 
3. Actively promote utility-sponsored energy efficiency programs for Portland homeowners.
 
4. Identify ways to meet the weatherization needs of elderly residents. Provide services in conjunction with agencies that serve the elderly.
 
5. Better serve low-income households, including Section 8 recipients, by coordinating with social service agencies and utilities through programs such as the Block-By-Block Weatherization Program and the Low-Income Energy Assistance Program. Investigate ways to share costs with property owners.
 
6. Promote energy efficient new construction by actively supporting the inclusion of cost-effective residential energy-saving measures in the State Building Code, similar to the Northwest Power Planning Council's Model Conservation Standards.
 
7. Support the development of a uniform home energy rating system to provide information on the energy performance of new and existing homes.
 
8. Investigate requiring energy audits for any residential structure receiving financing from the Portland Development Commission.
 
9.  Avoid lost conservation opportunities by encouraging property owners to install all cost-effective weatherization measures when weatherizing their rental properties.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
10. Identify ways to encourage local lenders to promote energy-efficient homes by counting future energy savings as income when determining the size of a home loan.
 
11. Investigate options for time-of-sale weatherization for residential properties.
 
12. Facilitate the weatherization of 20,000 low-income multi-family units by the year 2000.
 
e.  Policy #4 shall be: Energy Efficiency through Land Use Regulations
 
The City shall promote residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation energy efficiency and the use of renewable resources.
 
Objectives
 
Two-Year Action Plan
 
1. Promote land use patterns that increase energy efficiency in buildings and transportation systems by making energy efficiency a critical element when developing new zoning regulations and modifying old regulations and the comprehensive map. This objective applies to the following long-range planning efforts:
(a) Downtown, regional and neighborhood commercial service centers and central industrial areas with a balance of complementary retail and employment activities. Locate them near major arterials and transit lines.
 
(b) Medium and high-density residential zones in and adjacent to the downtown core. Develop other general commercial centers and medium-density residential zones adjacent to neighborhood service centers.
 
(c) Housing adjacent to employment areas.
 
(d) Planned unit developments to include mixed uses.
 
(e) Zero lot line/common wall construction in designated low and medium density residential zones.
 
(f) Buildable "substandard" lots.
 
(g) Secondary rental units in single family, owner-occupied homes.
2. Promote density, location, and mix of land uses that decrease the length of required daily trips and encourage the consolidation of related trips.
 
3. Promote medium to high density residential near proposed transit stations and medium density residential development along major transit routes.
 
4. Reduce energy consumed for space heating residential buildings by promoting the construction and renovation of attached single and multi-family dwelling units.
 
5. Promote tree planting as a way to reduce summer cooling loads and air pollution, making sure the trees do not cause the need for additional street lighting.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
6. Investigate the potential for energy savings from solar access standards for commercial buildings and multi-family housing.
 
7. Work with other governments in the region to promote both mass transit and compact urban growth.
 
f. Policy #5 shall be: Energy Efficiency in Commercial and Industrial Facilities
 
The City shall encourage energy efficiency in existing commercial buildings and institutions by facilitating utility, local, State, and Federal financial and technical assistance.
 
Objectives
 
Two-Year Action Plan
 
1. Help 100 Portland businesses access existing utility, State, and Federal financial and technical assistance programs by 1992.
 
2. Actively support utility programs for commercial and industrial energy efficiency.
 
3. Support the amendment of the ODOE Business Energy Tax Credit program to offer up-front energy efficiency tax credits for businesses, similar to the incentives offered to multi-family building owners.
 
4. Continue to promote the inclusion of cost-effective commercial energy saving measures in the State building code, similar to the Northwest Power Planning Council's Model Conservation Standards, and require that commercial building designers submit energy code compliance forms with their applications for building permits.
 
5. Train Bureau of Buildings plans examiners to review plans for compliance with the commercial energy code with emphasis on lighting code requirements.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
6. Provide information to developers, architects, builders, and others interested in improving energy efficiency in new construction.
 
7. Help local schools, hospitals, and other public and non-profit groups to participate in State, Federal, and utility-sponsored energy efficiency programs.
 
8. Help set up training for businesses, schools, and institutions on operation and maintenance, energy accounting, life-cycle costing and other energy efficient management practices. Target small and medium businesses and major energy-using buildings.
 
9. Explore opportunities for promoting solar energy use and daylighting in commercial buildings.
 
10. Work with industry to identify opportunities for improving energy efficiency in process applications, including waste-heat recovery for cogeneration and district heating and cooling. Promote applicable State, Federal, and utility programs or incentives.
 
11. Study the impacts of reducing Multnomah County personal property tax for new investments in energy efficient equipment.
 
12. Encourage district heating and cooling, and renewable resources in new commercial and institutional buildings.
 
13. Study and provide information to the development community on the costs and benefits of certification of commissioning of air balancing, controls, and HVAC equipment in commercial buildings. (Commissioning means that energy systems in new buildings are certified to work the way they were designed in the original plans.)
 
g. Policy #6 shall be:  Energy Efficient Transportation
 
The City shall provide opportunities for non-auto transportation including alternative vehicles, buses, light rail, bikeways, and walkways. The City shall also promote the reduction of gasoline and diesel use by conventional buses, autos and trucks by increasing fuel efficiency and promoting the use of alternative fuels.
 
Objectives
 
Two-Year Action Plan
 
1. Conduct an alternative fuels demonstration project in conjunction with appropriate utility, local, and state government agencies.
 
2. Initiate the amendment of current ODOE Business Energy Tax Credit and Small-Scale Energy Loan Program legislation to include financial incentives for transportation options that reduce greenhouse gases and improve air quality.
 
3. Support efforts to ensure the energy efficiency of the transit system, including good street maintenance and traffic light synchronization.
 
4. Promote shared recreational use of school facilities and City parks, close-in recreation opportunities, and improved scheduling of events to reduce recreation-related transportation needs.
 
5. Promote the construction of a regional light rail transit system.
 
6. Support efforts to remove the limitation in the State Constitution affecting local vehicle registration fees. Additional fees could be used for non-highway projects such as alternatives to auto-based transportation, if local voters authorize.
 
7. Support an increase in the Federal mileage standards for new cars.
 
8. Promote walking and bicycle commuting by identifying routes, encouraging spot hazard improvements on city streets, the provision of bicycle lockers at park-and-ride lots, and investigating bicycle commuter service centers and covered walkways/sidewalks.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
9. Support an increase in the number of preferentially located parking spots available for carpools. Promote their availability.
 
10. Match carpool riders and provide transit information to City employees. Promote public/private partnerships to increase employee rideshare, transit use, and flex-time.
 
11. Investigate offering reduced cost bus passes to City employees and encourage similar action by the State, Multnomah County, and private employers.
 
12. Promote and provide technical assistance on alternative fuels for downtown business fleets.
 
13. Support changes in Federal tax laws to increase deductions for employer paid transit.
 
14. Promote efficient transportation options for commuting between Northwest urban centers.
 
h. Policy #7 shall be:  Telecommunications as an Energy Efficiency Strategy
 
The City shall research and support telecommunication opportunities that reduce the need for travel.
 
Objectives
 
Two-Year Action Plan
 
1. Develop a telecommunications policy for internal City use.
 
2. Examine City-wide telecommunications needs with local businesses, agencies, and developers.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
3. Investigate opportunities for City employees to allow off-site work and telecommuting, when appropriate.
 
4. Work with neighborhood commercial districts to identify and put into use telecommunication applications.
 
5. Investigate opportunities for a "24-hour City Hall" to provide information by computer access on City activities, services, hearings, and cultural/recreational events.
 
i. Policy #8 shall be:  Energy Supply
 
The City shall promote conservation as the energy resource of first choice. The City shall also support environmentally acceptable, sustainable energy sources, especially renewable resources such as solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass (wood, farm and municipal waste), cogeneration, and district heating and cooling.
 
Objectives
 
Two-Year Action Plan
 
1. Investigate and advocate opportunities for competitive bidding to "sell" conservation to utilities or the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The City could operate conservation programs and deliver "saved energy" in the form of less electricity or gas used. Assist the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC), and others on the development of competitive bidding policies.
 
2. Promote the continued long-term production and use of methane at City-owned facilities, such as the St. Johns Landfill and Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant.
 
3. Develop an energy supply assessment for the City, including solar, biomass, and opportunities for using district heating and cooling, when funding is available.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
4. Develop an energy contingency plan based on the State's plan to protect against fuel shortages.
 
5. Investigate the potential for using the City's groundwater system and wastewater treatment plant for district heating and cooling.
 
j. Policy #9 shall be:  Waste Reduction and Recycling
 
The City shall promote energy-saving activities such as: 1) reduced use of excess materials, such as packaging; 2) recovery of materials from the waste stream for direct reuse and remanufacture into new products; 3) recycling; and 4) purchase of products made from recycled materials.
 
Objectives
 
Two-Year Action Plan
 
1. Continue to support both City and intergovernmental efforts in the recycling of office wastepaper and other recyclable materials, the curbside recycling program and composting.
 
2. Set up recycling programs for 500 multi-family buildings and 20 downtown commercial buildings by 1992.
 
3. Help local businesses develop markets for recyclable materials.
 
4. Develop a plan, including targets and a schedule, to increase residential recycling.
 
Long-Term Plan
 
5. Promote economic reprocessing and reuse of asphalt removed from City streets. Promote the use of recycled asphalt and rubber (from tires) for paving.
 
6. Promote voluntary recycling of major glass, metal and wood products at construction and demolition sites.
 
7. Investigate opportunities for waste to energy and other waste recovery technologies.
 
8. Support activities to help METRO reach its goal of a 56 percent waste reduction in the METRO area by 2010.
HISTORY
 
Filed for inclusion in PPD December 1, 2003.
Ordinance No. 162975, passed by Council and effective April 25, 1990.