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POL Government Elected Officials Auditor Griffin-Valade Charter, Code & Policies City Code & Charter Online Code & Charter Title 16 Vehicles and Tra Chapter 16.20 Public Right-of-Way Parking
16.20.830 Area Eligibility.

All of the following eligibility criteria must be met before the area will be considered for the area parking permit program:

A. There must exist at some time during the day an occupancy rate of 75 percent or more of the existing on-street parking spaces. Twenty-five percent (25%) of the vehicles occupying the on-street spaces must be other than area vehicles. Vehicles that originate from outside the proposed permit program area but are visiting a resident or conducting business in the proposed permit program area will not be considered a commuter vehicle. This occupancy rate must occur at least 4 days per week and the neighborhood association, the business district association, and the City Traffic Engineer must agree that this occupancy will occur for a minimum of 9 months per year.

B. The requesting area must consist of a minimum of 40 block faces or 8,000 lineal feet of curb space.

C. An area that feels it is adversely affected by parking and is requesting permit parking must work through its neighborhood association or business district association as defined in City Code Section 3.96.020 and 3.96.030. If the area is not formally organized, it should directly contact the Office of the Neighborhood Associations for assistance. The Office of the Neighborhood Associations must review the request and discuss the eligibility of that area to form a neighborhood association or business district association in conformance with the criteria established.

D. The City Traffic Engineer must agree that the area permit parking program would promote benefits within the designated area.

1. Benefits may include, but are not limited to: increased access to area residents and businesses, reduced traffic congestion, increased traffic/pedestrian safety, reduced air/noise pollution, prevention of blighted areas, increased neighborhood unity, and promoting the use of alternative modes of transportation.

2. Adverse effects that may prevent implementation include, but are not limited to: transferring the problem to a different area, inability to effectively enforce program restrictions, lack of alternative modes of transportation, availability of simpler, cheaper solutions, and the legal existence of more than one firm with 50 or more employees that could not operate under the permit system constraints.